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Dr. Fazio’s work and professional career is focused on developing customized methods and non-contact optical techniques to measure full-field deformations on loaded materials with the aim of gaining a better and deeper understanding of the local biomechanical properties of ocular tissues and the ocular coats. His research efforts are focused on improving our technical ability to quantify, estimate, and predict the biomechanical response of the ocular tissue coats to intraocular pressure (IOP). He has developed next generation imaging techniques to measure local IOP-dependent deformations of the ocular coats at an unmatched nanometer precision. As a mechanical engineer with a solid foundation in machine construction, experimental mechanics, and biomechanical characterization of soft tissues, Dr. Fazio has gained the multidisciplinary expertise needed to investigate the biomechanical properties of the ocular coats and how they change due to age, race, and ocular diseases like glaucoma and myopia.

  



Top Publications Over the Last 5 Years 

MA Fazio, ME Clark, L Bruno, CA Girkin. In vivo optic nerve head mechanical response to intraocular and cerebrospinal fluid pressure: Imaging protocol and quantification method. Scientific Reports. 8(1), 12639.

MA Fazio, JK Johnstone, B Smith, L Wang, CA Girkin. Displacement of the lamina cribrosa in response to acute intraocular pressure elevation in normal individuals of African and European descent. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science. 57(7), 3331-3339.

MA Fazio, R Grytz, JS Morris, L Bruno, CA Girkin, JC Downs. Human scleral structural stiffness increases more rapidly with age in donors of African descent compared to donors of European descent. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science. 55(11), 7189-7198.

Key Discoveries Within the Last Year 

Dr. Fazio has determined that regions of highest biomechanical strain within the laminar cribrosa correlate with regions of glaucomatous injury, as well as validated our multi-camera speckle interferometer for dynamic full-field 3D displacement measurement during inflation testing of a human eye sclera. 

Key Discoveries Within the Last 5 Years

Dr. Fazio’s research determined that regions of highest biomechanical strain within the laminar cribrosa correlate with regions of glaucomatous injury. In addition, he demonstrated that the changes in the morphology and biomechanical behavior of the lamina cribrosa due to aging differ significantly across individuals of African and European ancestry. These changes may explain the differential susceptibility to glaucomatous injury seen with age between these two population groups. Using next generation imaging techniques to measure local IOP-dependent deformations of the ocular coats at an unmatched nanometer precision he has determined that the sclera becomes significantly more rigid with aging in individuals of African ancestry compared to those of European ancestry. These changes may explain the differential susceptibility to glaucomatous injury seen with age between these two population groups.